The Lost Ark – Small Things

The Lost Ark is a project that brings to the limelight our unique Australian fauna and flora in the aftermath of the bush fires.

One year on, we are looking at the possible ways in which we, as artists can raise awareness of all the conservation work that needs to be done.

“Small Things” is a piece bringing up the importance of small things that make up for a bigger picture.

Original score by Harvey Welsh Images by Akka Ballenger Constantin © 2021 Ballenger/Welsh

The Lost Ark – Dawn

“Dawn” is the next piece in our series – a beautiful morning out in the grasslands.

The Lost Ark is a project that brings to the limelight our unique Australian fauna and flora in the aftermath of the bush fires.

One year on, the grasslands are coming back to life and we are looking at the possible ways in which we, as artists can raise awareness of all the conservation work that needs to be done.

Original score by Harvey Welsh Images by Akka Ballenger Constantin © 2021 Ballenger/Welsh

The Lost Ark – Nocturne

The Final Cut for “The Lost Ark – Nocturne” is finally here.

The Nocturne was in the making for a long while and we kept tweaking it, but I think we are finally done with this piece. I am totally in love with the music – it works so well with the images.

If you joined us later, The Lost Ark is a project that brings to the limelight our unique Australian fauna and flora in the aftermath of the bush fires.

One year on, “Nocturne” is a glimpse at the way the grasslands are coming back to life. We are looking at the possible ways in which we, as artists can raise awareness of all the conservation work that needs to be done.

Original score by Harvey Welsh Images by Akka Ballenger Constantin © 2021 Ballenger/Welsh

The Lost Ark

“The Lost Ark” is an opportunity of learning together. This series of drawings, linocuts and etchings brings back the focus on the aftermath of the 2019-2020 bush fires and their impact on our unique Australian fauna.

An interim report, “Australia’s 2019-2020 Bushfires: The Wildlife Toll” commissioned by WWF Australia concluded that more than three billion animals were killed or displaced: 143 million mammals, 2.46 billion reptiles, 180 million birds and 51 million frogs.

I am an art educator, working with young children. Often, I find myself embracing their spontaneity in my own artistic practice and for this body of works I chose the same informal approach, where feeling and playfulness prevail, taking over realistic/ natural illustration detail.

Through these images, I hope to bring to limelight some of our unique species and I would like to encourage the public not only to learn more about our wildlife, but also to donate their time and to support financially the Wildlife rescue program.

* 10% of the works on sale will go to two local charities, ACT Wildlife and Wild Talk.

Please consider donating to these two charities. Thank you

Click here for a donation to ACT Wildlife:

Click here for a donation to Wild Talk

“Open Up” Update

Not long ago, I developed “Open Up”; an art installation with the purpose of bringing forward the forgotten power of words. It is a simple construction, where several origami shurikens with poems written on them are placed (both visibly and in hiding) in a book. This is an interactive installation; the public is invited to contribute to this installation with their own thoughts and to reflect on what words mean to them, how they use it and how it affects the others. I was overwhelmed by the generous support received from my fellow artists and poets, as well as from other members of the public.

During the critical feed-back session in my class, I really loved one particular comment, coming from my teacher. She had this vision of shurikens through the book shelves. I struggled with how to achieve this. I have a great respect for libraries and would not do anything that could be deemed as littering, or disrespectful. On the other hand, I felt that concealing the shurikens around the shelves or in the books may be exactly what is needed, to bring up the hidden power of words. It made me think with nostalgia back to the pre-internet times, when borrowing books from the library, I would find a random note from a total stranger, writing about the reasons they loved the book you were reading and asking you to continue writing about it. It resulted in charming chain-letters placed within the book for the next person to find.

However, what helped me make up my mind was the fact that mid project, the question was raised from members of the public not living in Canberra whether they could be considered to participate. This, and the willingness of other participants to keep on contributing poems, made me consider giving this project a new life, both on Social Media and around libraries and cultural institutions in Canberra, both in an analogue and a digital form.
I have created a QR code that links to the project’s explanation. This QR code will be attached to shuriken-poems who will be placed randomly but respectfully around cultural institutions. If you are the one finding our shurikens, please consider contributing your own, placing it in a location significant to you.

Also, you can chose to take images or selfies and upload them on the Social media with the hashtag #OpenUp.

Thank you.